Events

Events
  • Thursday 9 May 2019Family Law Masterclass (1)

    “Disputes over relationship property are at the epicentre of family law. How they are resolved reveals the values family law is based on and shows how conflicting interests are prioritised.” [M. Henaghan, New Zealand Law Review, Part III 2018] In this seminar Professor Henaghan examines the complex recent decision of the Supreme Court in Scott v Williams. This case discussed a number of important procedural matters. It also decided three significant issues of relationship property law, issues that commonly arise in property relationship cases. These include: the vesting of property in the hands of one partner, valuation of a business, and the calculation of compensation when there is a disparity of income between the parties. In addition, our presenter reviews the Law Commission Report that was released in November 2018 that considered the Relationship (Property) Act 1976. One of the key proposals was that the family home should no longer be split 50:50 between the parties. What would this mean in relationship property cases and what are the merits of these proposals? About the Speaker Mark is the joint author of Family Law in New Zealand, and Family Law Policy in New Zealand, both punished by Lexis Nexis, and Relationships Property on Death published by Thomson Brookers. Mark has taught family law for forty years and is currently a Professor of Law at the University of Auckland. Earn 1.5 CPD Points

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  • Wednesday 15 May 2019Media Law Seminar

    Media Law has seen many recent developments. A line up of leading experts will update you on: • Restrictions on the nature of material that can be published on line; • Hate speech in light of the terrible Christchurch attack; • Reform of the law on contempt; • Recent developments in defamation; • Updates on Media law issues; • Take Down orders from the courts.

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  • Tuesday 4 June 2019Data Privacy in the Big Data Era

    The technology and promise of big data, together with algorithms and artificial intelligence, have revolutionised our society. They bring not only new opportunities, but also risks, to the way we live, work and make decisions. In private business and in the public sector, these evolving technologies have been used for the purposes of profiling, monitoring, predictive analysis and risk calculation. At the same time, we, as individuals, have become digitised data selves. More worrying, the proxy data self can dictate the life of the corporeal self, as we have seen in the practice of financial credit scoring or social credit scoring. This lecture explores data privacy protection for the digitized persona, focusing on the challenges brought by profiling. The speaker argues that we should move from a pure opt-in consent regime to an accountability model for big data analytics. Thank you to the Law Foundation for their support of our 2019 Visiting Scholar!

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  • Thursday 6 June 2019Rating Reputation: Online Defamation

    The 21st century has witnessed a blossoming of rating, evaluation or even blacklisting sites. We are living in a “reputation nation,” where our conduct is evaluated often by anonymous individuals in different aspects, entailing the dangers of shame sanctions. This reputation rating system is far from being a system of formal adjudication. It may carry false or incorrect information, and may not allow an individual to correct such information. Drawing on judicial jurisprudence in the UK, US and Germany on online rating sites, this presentation examines how different jurisdictions have endeavoured to strike the balance between reputation and freedom of expression. What has yet to be addressed is the issue of how to develop a new model with an appropriate procedural layout that can accommodate social norms, technological advancement and the legal right to protect reputation on online platforms. In this lecture, the speaker advocates for a new regime that requires online rating sites to have netiquette and information policy, including the right to reply amongst other requirements. Thank you to the Law Foundation for their support of our 2019 Visiting Scholar!

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  • Wednesday 12 June 2019Arbitration Masterclass with Anna Kirk

    Arbitrator, Dr Anna Kirk, reviews developments across New Zealand and English case law on arbitration, and amendments to the Arbitration Act 1996.

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  • Tuesday 11 June 2019Data Privacy in the Big Data Era (Wellington Lecture)

    The technology and promise of big data, together with algorithms and artificial intelligence, have revolutionised our society. They bring not only new opportunities, but also risks, to the way we live, work and make decisions. In private business and in the public sector, these evolving technologies have been used for the purposes of profiling, monitoring, predictive analysis and risk calculation. At the same time, we, as individuals, have become digitised data selves. More worrying, the proxy data self can dictate the life of the corporeal self, as we have seen in the practice of financial credit scoring or social credit scoring. This lecture explores data privacy protection for the digitized persona, focusing on the challenges brought by profiling. The speaker argues that we should move from a pure opt-in consent regime to an accountability model for big data analytics.

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